Category Archives: brick walls

Flynn kin? An Irish origins project

We genealogists love our cemeteries and tombstones. So here’s a question for you—have you ever come across a grave marker that boasted about the county where the deceased was born? So-and-so was “a native of Erie County, Pennsylvania”?

Who does that, right? Well, I’ll tell you….

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DNA evidence: takeaways from SLIG

Last month I mentioned prepping for a week-long immersion in Meeting Standards Using DNA Evidence—Research Strategies, led by Karen Stanbary, CG, at the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG). It was a tremendously valuable experience. I’ll share some takeaways here.

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Genealogy progress guaranteed

I’m a little late in posting this month, but for a very good reason! Next week I am off to the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG) for a one-week immersion in a program called Meeting Standards Using DNA Evidence – Research Strategies, led by Karen Stanbury, CG. In this class, we will study methodologies and strategies to apply best practices when we want to combine DNA results with our documentary evidence to reach a conclusion. Since the first of the year, I’ve been preparing a DNA case-study-in-progress of my own to present to some of the class.

What does this have to do with guaranteed progress? And how could it help you?

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An open letter to my DNA cousins

Dear Cousin,

I’m so glad to ‘meet’ you through DNA testing! I have lots of family history gems to share and explore with you. Perhaps we can help each other. I have copies of wills and obituaries and photos and maps I can send you–and family lore too!

Since March is the month we celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, I thought I’d offer several Irish examples. (But there’s a Colonial American example at the end too.)

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Applying DNA to a genealogy brick wall: getting started

10-10-10                     

Happy Birthday, Nancy Agness Ann Jameson, born 10 Oct 1810!

birthday-cake-public domain

That’s a fun date to remember—and a lot of given names for a little lass born in Kentucky so long ago. I wish I knew more about her. She appeared seemingly out of nowhere in Greene County Ohio in the summer of 1832, when she married James Hammond. By 1840, they had relocated to Holmes County Ohio, and around 1850 their growing family moved to DeKalb County Indiana. Nancy spent the rest of her life there and died a widow in 1888. My search for her parents reached a dead end pretty quickly.

Could DNA help me find her mom or dad?

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