I made up a new acronym! MDIDS

One of the fun things about managing your DNA matches in a spreadsheet is that you can choose to log whatever matters to you. I just added a new column to mine, and I invented a new acronym to go with it! It’s MDIDS (I pronounce it M-dids); and I use it alongside MRCA (Most Recent Common Ancestor), because sometimes MRCA isn’t quite what I want.

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Managing multiple kits – and the new AncestryDNA change

 

There has been lots of brouhaha in the genetic genealogy community this week! AncestryDNA just announced some dramatic changes coming July 18th for people who want to manage multiple kits. In a nutshell, AncestryDNA kits that are registered on that date or later must have their own unique Ancestry account, with its own unique email. This can be a free account, and we can still manage those other kits, but it involves a bit more effort, especially initially.

I have some relevant links that I’d like to share here, in two sets. Before we think about the AncestryDNA policy change, we need to think about some implications of managing other people’s DNA results in general. So that’s the first set. And then we can learn more about the specific impact of Ancestry’s announcement and how to deal with those changes—for that, see the second set of links.

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Negative Evidence: genealogy methodology and DNA

Genetic genealogy, like documentary genealogy, can result in negative findings and negative evidence. What’s the difference? (It wasn’t that long ago that I was confused about that too!)

You start with a research question and a source. ‘Negative’ means the information you’re looking for in the source isn’t found. A negative finding doesn’t help you answer your research question. Negative evidence does. You may have to understand the context to know which one you have. Some examples, with document-source genealogy and DNA-source genealogy, may help.

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Triangulation with GEDmatch

On 25 Mar 2017, the Central Indiana DNA Interest Group is giving an in-depth presentation on the valuable (and mostly free!) DNA tools at GEDmatch.

At this program, we’ll be talking about the benefits of GEDmatch and walking through how to use the site. Of course, the most Basic perk of GEDmatch is that you can compare DNA from people who tested across different platforms (companies). On an Intermediate level, GEDmatch has tools to help you sort your matches into different lines of your family tree. For participants open to dipping their toes into Advanced territory, we’ll talk a bit about * triangulation *.

I know when I attend webinars or presentations, sometimes my brain gets full and doesn’t process everything I just heard. Then it’s helpful to have a resource to revisit later to help the more complex material sink in. So I thought I’d post something about * triangulation * on my blog this month!

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Using cM counts to help find the common ancestor: part 3 of 3

What if your analysis of your match doesn’t match the shared cM chart?

Most people are able to find their Most Recent Common Ancestor (MRCA) when they share over 90 cM of matching DNA. Below that, it begins to get a little more challenging. In this February 2017 series of blog posts, I’ve been focusing on identifying the MRCA with people who share more than 60 cM with us, projected to be 4th cousins or closer. You may not have much in that range and have chosen to work with matches who share 45-60 cM with you. That’s okay. There are a few key reasons why we want to focus on this group.

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